Posts Tagged ‘easy’

posters for baby’s room

DIY black and white nursery posters on elsie marley

A year or so ago I was invited to join a facebook group filled with mothers, bloggers, sewers, bakers, and makers of all types. The idea behind the group was to have a place to talk about blog things, get support when we needed it, and have a sounding board for new ideas. The group is absolutely amazing, and the women in it doubly so.

DIY black and white nursery posters on elsie marley

Two of those women, Carla and Lacy, are pregnant and due any day now! We’ve come together to throw a kind of virtual baby shower. Some people make decorations, some people make the food, some make gifts, and then we send it all to the pregnant ladies. It’s like an awesome party via post. I signed up for decoration duty. Right away I knew I wanted to make large-scale posters. We peeked in their pinterest boards and discovered Lacy was digging a cloud theme, and Carla was more for the moon and stars.


summer journal: making hula hoops

homemade hula hoops

Making hula hoops is surprisingly simple and cheap to boot: some polyurethane pipe, a connector, and duct tape. Done.

homemade hula hoops

I scanned some random directions quickly when I was in the hardware store, but there are many good tutorials for making hula hoops out there. This video by Elizabeth Mitchel–who is awesome by the way–tells you how it’s done.

hula hooping


summer journal: grape sculptures

grape sculptures

toothpicks + grapes

grape sculptures

=sculptures and snacks

summer journal: scavenger hunt

Color coded egg carton scavenger hunt before:

egg carton scavenger hunt

Color coded egg carton scavenger hunt after:

color coded scavenger hunt


painterly skirt tutorial

For my contribution to Skirt Week 2012, I made this little tutorial for turning an old, rather boring skirt into something a bit more interesting. Sometimes you don’t need to make a new skirt, but you need to liberate one from the back of your closet. I had planned on doing a tutorial for a button placket, but then I saw this picture and could not stop thinking about it:

These pants are from a shop in New York that specializes in super awesome Japanese children’s clothes. The idea is so simple and so effortlessly cool that I had to steal it.

painterly skirt tutorial

painterly skirt


  • 1 unloved skirt
  • a bit of cardboard or freezer paper
  • paint of your choice, fabric or acrylic or even house paint*
  • stamps
  • very small paint brush

painterly skirt materials



1. The first thing I did was carve some starts out of an old eraser. If you’ve never done this before it may sound hard, but I assure you it is not. I carved two stamps from a big eraser and two from the tiny erasers on a pair of new pencils. It took me all of 10 minutes. There are many good tutorials for carving stamps from erasers out there (this one and this one for example). The stamp you make should be quite small, so stick to a simple shape–stars work well!

starting the stars

2. Put a piece of cardboard under where you will be stamping, or you can iron a bit of freezer paper to the back. You need something under your design, so the paint doesn’t bleed through to the other side.

3. Start stamping! You can be as fussy or as messy as you want. The look we are going for is paint wiped on the side of your skirt, so there aren’t too many rules you have to follow. It looks nice if the stamps are concentrated a bit in one area and then fade out towards the edges.

stars painted

3. After you have stamped to your heart’s content, take a very small paintbrush and go over some of the stamps with more paint. This will make some of the stars stand out better and give the design a little more dimension.

4. Let the paint dry and go over it with an iron to set it.  Waalaa! a new skirt! One that will be loved and worn again!

before after painterly skirt

*a note on paint: I don’t paint on my clothes very often, but when I do (like here and here) I like to use a product called fabric meduim. You mix the meduim with any acrylic paint and it makes it into a fabric paint. A good friend of mine turned me on to it. Another good friend told me to get out of the not-so-great craft acrylic paint aisle and go to the actually-an-artist acrylic paint aisle: the colors and the quality are better.

painterly skirt after